How Eating The Right Nutrients Can Boost Fertility

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Basically all nutrients are important for health; there are some that have been specifically shown to have a direct impact on fertility. Below is a list of these nutrients and the foods you can find them. This week we would be looking at Micronutrients.

 Micronutrients

Vitamin C: Vitamin C improves hormone levels and increases fertility in women and in men, vitamin C has been shown to improve sperm quality and protect sperm from DNA damage; helping to reduce the chance of miscarriage and chromosomal problems. Vitamin C also appears to keep sperm from clumping together, making them more motile.

Food sources:  vegetables and fruits including red peppers, broccoli, cranberries, cabbage, potatoes, tomatoes, and citrus fruit.

Vitamin D: Vitamin D is essential it helps the body create sex hormones which in turn affects ovulation and hormonal balance.

Food sources: Eggs, fatty fish, dairy, and cod liver oil. You can also get vitamin D from sitting out in the sun for 15 to 20 minutes per day, but absorption is impacted by the darkness of your skin.

Vitamin E: Vitamin E has been shown in studies to improve sperm health and motility in men. Studies have also shown a diet deficient in Vitamin E to be a cause of infertility in rats. The meaning of the name for vitamin E ‘Tocopherol’ literally means to bear young. Vitamin E is also an important antioxidant to help protect sperm and egg DNA integrity.

Food sources: Sunflower seeds, almonds, olives, spinach, papaya, dark leafy greens.

B6: Vitamin B6 may be used as a hormone regulator. It also helps to regulate blood sugars, alleviates PMS, and may be useful in relieving symptoms of morning sickness.

Food sources: Tuna, banana, turkey, liver, salmon, cod, spinach, bell peppers, and turnip greens, collard greens, garlic, cauliflower, mustard greens, celery, cabbage, asparagus, broccoli, kale, Brussels sprouts, chard.

 

B12: Vitamin B12 has been shown to improve sperm quality and production. It also may help to boost the endometrium lining in egg fertilization, decreasing the chances of miscarriage. Some studies have found that a deficiency of B12 may increase the chances of irregular ovulation, and in severe cases stop ovulation altogether.

Food sources: liver, fish, crab, lobster, beef, lamb, cheese, eggs.

Folic Acid/Folate: Perhaps one of the best known vitamins necessary for pregnancy is folic acid, the common supplement form of naturally occurring folate, which is found in many foods. This vitamin helps prevent neural tube defects as well as congenital heart defects, cleft lips, limb defects, and urinary tract anomalies in developing foetuses. Deficiency in folic acid may increase the risk of preterm labour, foetal growth retardation and low birth weight. Deficiency may also increase the homocysteine level in the blood, which can lead to spontaneous abortion and pregnancy complications, such as placental abruption and preeclampsia.

Food sources of folate: liver, lentils, chickpeas, asparagus, spinach, black beans, navy beans, kidney beans, collard greens.

Iron: Studies have shown that women who do not get sufficient amounts of iron may suffer anovulation (lack of ovulation) and possibly poor egg health, which can inhibit pregnancy at a rate 60% higher than those with sufficient iron stores in their blood.

Food sources: Lentils, spinach, sesame seeds, kidney beans, pumpkin seeds, chickpeas, beans, molasses, beef.

Selenium: Selenium is an antioxidant that helps to protect the eggs and sperm from free radicals. Free radicals can cause chromosomal damage which is known to be a cause of miscarriages and birth defects. Selenium is also necessary for the creation of sperm. In studies, men with low sperm counts have also been found to have low levels of selenium; this should be taken very seriously ladies.

Food sources: Liver, snapper, cod, tuna, salmon, sardines, shrimp, turkey, Brazil nuts (just one nut contains nearly 100% of the RDA for selenium).

Zinc: In women, zinc works with more than 300 different enzymes in the body to keep things working well. Without it, your cells can not divide properly; your oestrogen and progesterone levels can get out of balance and your reproductive system may not be fully functioning. Low levels of zinc have been directly linked to miscarriage in the early stages of a pregnancy.

In men, zinc is considered one of the most important trace minerals to date for male fertility; increasing zinc levels in infertile men has been shown to boost sperm levels; improve the form, function and quality of male sperm and decrease male infertility.

Food sources:  beef, lamb, sesame seeds, pumpkin seeds, yogurt, turkey, green peas, shrimp. Zinc can be damaged by cooking so it is important to eat some foods high in zinc in their raw forms.

Essential Fatty Acids: Omega-3 acids have been shown to help fertility by helping to regulate hormones in the body, increase cervical mucous, promote ovulation and overall improve the quality of the uterus by increasing blood flow to the reproductive organs.

Omega-3 fats also contain two acids that are crucial to good health: DHA and EPA. These two acids have been shown to help many forms of disease. Low levels of DHA have been linked to depression and other mental health issues. During pregnancy, a lack of DHA may be associated with premature birth, low birth weight and hyperactivity in children.

Food sources: Flax seeds, walnuts, salmon, sardines, shrimp, snapper, scallops, chia seeds.

Next week we would be looking at Macronutrients.

 

Stay blessed and enjoy the rest of your week!!!!!

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