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Daily Meditation

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  • #1696
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    Today’s meditation is from Acts 4: 23-31

    They were all filled with the Holy Spirit. (Acts 4:31)

    Imagine that you had just finished the best vacation of your life. You ate really well; you tried a few new activities; you thoroughly enjoyed being with your friends or family. It was perfect in every way. You came back refreshed, peaceful, and full of energy—ready to tackle whatever was waiting for you at home. You probably also began thinking and planning another refreshing vacation just like it!

    In today’s first reading, the disciples, who had been so excited and overjoyed on the day of Pentecost, are in need of some spiritual refreshment. They keep getting thrown in prison for sharing the gospel, and the threats seem to be increasing rather than decreasing. You can imagine how worn out they must have been feeling! So in need of God’s help, they pray to the Spirit, who they know will show them how to move forward. And he answers their prayers powerfully! The place where they are gathered shakes, and they are filled with the Spirit once more.

    Wait a minute. Didn’t the disciples already receive the Holy Spirit? Weren’t they filled with the Spirit at Pentecost? Why do they need another filling?

    Being filled with the Spirit is not the same thing as a glass being filled with water. We don’t “contain” the Spirit. We can’t control him or keep him locked up in our hearts. He is always flowing, always moving, always pouring out of us. And so, as life hands us challenges, we find times when we need our own spiritual “vacation,” times when we need to be filled anew. Then, once we have been refreshed, we are able to go back out into the world with new energy, peace, and conviction.

    It’s possible to live from “strength to strength”, but only as we keep asking the Spirit to fill us again and again. He is our one reliable source of strength, love, and encouragement (Psalm 84:8).

    So make it a point to turn to the Spirit in every challenging situation, big or small, that you face. He doesn’t mind filling you over and over again, as long as you keep pouring yourself out for the people around you. Remember, his goal is to make each of us into vessels for his grace.

    “Holy Spirit, thank you for filling me every time I need refreshment!”

    Culled from The Word Among Us (https://wau.org/meditations/current/)

    #1737
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    Today’s meditation is from Acts 5: 17 – 26

    Go and take your place in the temple area, and tell the people everything about this life. (Acts 5:20)

    Was there ever a time when you felt trapped inside a “prison” of illness, emotional distress, or weak faith? Waking up every morning, it felt as if there were a dark cloud over your head or a ball and chain dragging you down. Now, remember the day that you woke up feeling better or the moment that your situation was resolved. What a sense of release! You couldn’t wait to move forward with your life, relieved of those restraints!

    If you had the choice, would you willingly go back into that prison? This was precisely what the apostles did in today’s first reading. An angel of God released them from their prison cell then told them to go right back to the Temple area and tell people about their life in Christ—the very thing that got them into prison in the first place. And they did! They couldn’t keep quiet about the Lord, so they trusted that God would take care of them.

    Today’s Responsorial Psalm tells us why the apostles were so committed to proclaiming the gospel in the face of arrest and imprisonment. “I will bless the Lord at all times,” the psalmist says, “his praise shall be ever in my mouth.” But why? So that “the lowly will hear me and be glad” (Psalm 34:2, 3). The apostles’ witness and their courage inspired everyone in the Church in Jerusalem to stay faithful to the Lord. It also was instrumental in bringing more people to conversion. They blessed the Lord so that his blessings could overflow to other people!

    The same is true for us. Our testimony of how God has worked in our lives can hearten our brothers and sisters who may be struggling. Likewise, their stories can help us. It’s always good, when feeling hemmed in, to be reminded that our horizons are a lot bigger than we think! What’s more, the witness of our joy and peace in every situation, no matter how easy and challenging, can motivate the people around us to turn to the Lord and experience him themselves.

    So keep on blessing the Lord! Who knows how many people you will help lead to freedom?

    “Thank you, Jesus, for having rescued me! Help me to keep your praise always on my lips and in my heart.”

    Other Readings for the Day:

    Responsorial Psalm: Psalm 34:2-9

    Gospel: John 3:16-21

    Culled from The Word Among Us (https://wau.org/meditations/current/)

    #1987
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    April 27th, 2015

    Today’s meditation is from John 10: 1- 10

    4th Week of Easter

    The sheep follow him, because they recognize his voice. (John 10:4)

    Do you hear voices? We all do, you know—all different kinds of voices. Some are actual voices, but there are also the voices in our minds: what we imagine certain people would say if they really knew us, as well as our own inner voice. Some of the voices are spiritual, from the Lord as well as from the devil’s tempters. There’s a lot going on in our minds, so it’s helpful to try to sort through all the voices to make sure we’re listening to the right ones.

    In today’s Gospel reading, Jesus tells us that we are able to recognize his voice. It’s the voice of the Good Shepherd, a voice that we, his “sheep,” know and respond to (John 10:4). His voice speaks words of care and protection. He points us toward paths of safety and provision. He speaks words of acceptance and love.

    What are you hearing? The voice of someone other than your shepherd? Maybe they’re words of condemnation or accusation, telling you that you are a failure or a disappointment. Maybe the voices seem like they’re coming from outside yourself, or maybe they are clearly your own words, the way you think about yourself. It doesn’t matter too much where they’re coming from. What matters is that these words do not come from the Good Shepherd, so you need to run away from them like a frightened sheep.

    You have the ability to control this inner conversation. You can choose whom to listen to. Blaise Pascal once said, “Man is so made that if he is told often enough that he is a fool he believes it. By telling himself often enough he convinces himself, because when he is alone he carries on an inner dialogue with himself which is important to keep under proper control.” Don’t let that happen! Don’t pay attention to any voice that contradicts what the Good Shepherd is telling you.

    Try an experiment today. Try to identify one or two “internal conversations” that you don’t think are Jesus’ words for you, and shut them down. Then try listening for his voice. Isn’t it a far more encouraging—and inspiring—thing to hear?

    “Lord, help me to hear and recognize your voice today.”

    Other readings for the day:

    1st Reading: Acts 11:1-18

    Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 42:2-3; 43:3-4

    Culled from https://wau.org/meditations/current/

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    #2004
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    I saw this picture this morning, and it really resonated with me! He most surely got this!!!  :heart:

    #2005
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    April 28th, 2015

    Today’s meditation is from Acts 11: 19-26

    Saint Peter Chanel, Priest and Martyr

    The hand of the Lord was with them. (Acts 11:21)

    History is filled with unlikely pairings that work amazingly well. Think, for instance, about food pairings: bacon and chocolate, caramel and salt, or bananas on pizza. Or think about how opposites often attract in marriage: the slob and the neat freak, for example.

    Well, in ancient Antioch, another kind of pairing, but no less unique, appeared: Jews and Greeks sharing the same religious convictions. Historically, there was a great enmity between these two groups, and in a city as big as Antioch, they could have easily kept to themselves. There were plenty of synagogues to go around, as well as more than enough Greek temples. Yet in the midst of this divided city, the Holy Spirit touched the hearts of Jews and Gentiles alike, making them into “Christians” (Acts 11:26).

    When word reached the apostles and elders in Jerusalem, they were intrigued and perhaps a bit skeptical. Would the Gentiles dilute the purity of the Jews’ faith? Would the Jews look down on their Gentile brothers and sisters? Such a potentially volatile and delicate situation needed some attention. So they sent Barnabas to study the situation. Though this was clearly a unique pairing, Barnabas could see that it was God’s doing, so he “rejoiced and encouraged them all to remain faithful to the Lord” (Acts 11:23).

    Just as the Holy Spirit created an unlikely pairing in Antioch, he is doing something similar today. He is encouraging Christians from different faith traditions to come together and pray for greater unity. For example, in a video he recorded on a Protestant pastor’s iPhone, Pope Francis addressed a gathering of Pentecostal leaders. “Let’s move forward,” he urged them. “We are brothers; let us give each other that spiritual embrace and allow the Lord to complete the work he has begun.”

    Whenever Christians from different traditions, whether in ancient Antioch or in the cyberspace of today, come together, it’s a sign that “the hand of the Lord” is at work (Acts 11:21). Today, let’s all pray for Christian unity. May we become witnesses of our own unique pairings with our brothers and sisters in Christ!

    “Holy Spirit, thank you for my brothers and sisters of all faith traditions. Come and make us one!”

    Psalm 87:1-7; John 10:22-30

    #2068
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    April 30th, 2015

    Today’s meditation is taken from John 13: 16 – 20

    I am. (John 13:19)

    Jesus probably startled his disciples when he identified himself as “I am” and then delivered what seems to be a word problem: “Whoever receives the one I send receives me, and whoever receives me receives the one who sent me” (John 13:20).

    Jesus wanted the disciples to be clear. They were to give the One he would send—that is, the Holy Spirit—the same fidelity and loyalty they were giving to him and his words. He also wanted them to know that having received him meant they had received the Father, too.

    In this context, “to receive” is a very active thing. It means to lay hold of, to seize, to accept, to try out. It’s not passive at all. “Go ahead and take it” rather than “Close your eyes and hold out your hands.”

    This is important! Jesus wants all of us to lay hold of the Holy Spirit, to pursue him and try him out. This is the only way we will be able to do his work on earth—and it’s the only way we’ll develop a personal relationship with God. Developing both an interior spiritual life and a more outward, practical experience of the Spirit are both essential to living the life Jesus offers us. Actively receiving is the key to experiencing a life that is creative, nurturing, exciting, and full of love.

    You can live like that! You can, because you have received the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Is someone you know far from the Lord? Ask the Father to give you the words and love that will draw that person to him. Is a friend or family member sick or anxious? Pray with that person, and ask for Jesus’ healing. Do problems loom at work? Ask the Spirit to inspire you with creative solutions. Your life with God is meant to overflow, touching everyone around you!

    So go ahead and actively receive the Holy Spirit. Receive the Father, the One who sent Jesus. Seek to know his heart and thoughts. Spend time in his presence. Ask him questions. Ask him to make you look like him. You will be surprised and delighted by what he will do for you!

    “Jesus, I want to go for it today! Holy Spirit, work in me and through me. Father, foster in me more of your character.”

    1st Reading: Acts 13:13-25

    Responsorial Psalm: Psalm 89:2-3, 21-22, 25, 27

    Culled from https://wau.org/meditations/current/

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    #2108
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    May 1st, 2015

    Today’s meditation is from Acts 13: 26 – 33

    We ourselves are proclaiming this good news to you that what God promised our fathers, He has brought to fulfillment for us, their children. (Acts 13:32-33)

    What do you think about prophecy? Today’s Mass readings are like two lamps that illuminate this enigmatic gift. We find the first lamp in Acts, as Paul preaches the gospel to the Jews in Pisidian Antioch. Drawing from traditional messianic prophecies in the Hebrew Scripture, he points to Jesus as their fulfillment. His sermon even includes a verse from today’s psalm prophesying about the divine sonship of Christ. In the light of this first lamp, we discover that prophecy reveals Jesus and points people to him! Other Scripture passages confirm this point, that “witness to Jesus is the spirit of prophecy” (Revelation 19:10).

    Now, look at today’s Gospel reading. Jesus told his disciples that he would go away but would come back for them and welcome them into his Father’s house. By the light of this second lamp, we can see that prophecy is meant to encourage people. Even if their delivery sometimes seems harsh, these prophecies are intended to help God’s people down the right path. Essentially, prophecy in the Scriptures is nothing more than giving a message from God.

    In this sense, we’re all meant to prophesy: to give people a message that will help them draw closer to the Lord and to encourage them along their path to him.

    Could God give you a special, uplifting word that strikes someone’s heart? Absolutely! Especially as you go through your day keeping one ear tuned to his voice. Even if you don’t receive a specific message, you still have something to say. You have the story of the dramatic twists and turns that your life has taken and the ways God has revealed himself to you.

    Today, come to Jesus with an open heart and mind. Pay attention to the thoughts that come to you in prayer—about your family, a friend, or a neighbor. Does he have a message about his grace that he wants you to share?

    “Here I am, Lord! Give me the heart of a prophet!”

    Other Readings

    Psalm 2:6-11; John 14:1-6

    Culled from https://wau.org/meditations/current/

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    #2131
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    May 2nd, 2015

    Today’s meditation is from John 14: 7 – 14

    Have I been with you for so long a time and you still do not know Me? (John 14:9)

    Many superhero movies have a scene in which the masked hero unveils himself to his family, his friends, or the woman he loves. Usually, the people are shocked to discover that this ordinary person is also a secret crime fighter with special powers. But when they start to piece together all of the facts, the truth seems obvious.

    Today’s Gospel reading has a similar plot line, but with a different twist. During the Last Supper, Jesus takes off his “mask” and tells the apostles who he really is: “I am in the Father and the Father is in me” (John 14:11). But the twist is that his big revelation is met with doubt—and by Philip, no less, someone who has been with Jesus from the beginning (John 1:43).

    You might expect Jesus to be disappointed in Philip and the others, but that’s not how he reacts. Rather, he walks them through the facts and helps them piece it all together: the miracles they have seen him perform and the words they have heard him speak. Then he goes on to tell them that they too will be able to do superhero-like feats as they grow in their faith and trust in him. He tells them that they are destined to be heroic proclaimers of God’s mercy and grace-filled witnesses to the power and love of their Father.

    Just as Jesus revealed himself to the apostles at the Last Supper, he reveals himself to us every time we gather for Mass. He teaches us through the Scripture readings, and he moves our hearts at Communion. He shows us that he is present among our brothers and sisters, and he urges us to become like him in the way we love each other.

    So when you go to Mass tomorrow, pay close attention to the readings. See if you can discern Jesus’ voice in them. Is he saying something to you personally? When you pray, “Lord, have mercy,” let him convince you that he has taken away your sins. When you go to receive him in the form of bread and wine, ask him to open your eyes to his presence more clearly—and to make you more like him!

    “Open my eyes, Lord, to Your love and Your presence!”

    Other Readings: Acts 13:44-52; Psalm 98:1-4

    Culled from https://wau.org/meditations/current/

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    #2211
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    May 5th, 2015

    Today’s meditation is from John 14: 27-31

    My peace I give to you. Not as the world gives do I give it to you. (John 14:27)

    In the late nineteenth century, French artists experimented with a new technique in painting called pointillism. They used small dots of color to create pictures. Up close, dots are all you can see. But step back, and the picture becomes clear! Sometimes, our lives can be like that. Daily joys and problems, ups and downs, can loom large before our eyes. We get distracted by the chaotic or colorful or tragic moments. We lose our peace or get swept up into an unwarranted sense of excitement. We forget to step back and see the big picture.

    The peace that Jesus promises us in today’s Gospel reading is not something we conjure up on our own. It doesn’t come from manipulating our circumstances so that nothing ruffles our feathers. It’s far more solid and reliable than that.

    Look at Paul and Barnabas: they certainly had ups and downs! They were threatened with being stoned while in Iconium, so they moved to Lystra, where the people hailed them as gods. But these same people were easily swayed and attacked Paul, leaving him for dead. Then, escaping Lystra, Paul and Barnabas ended up making a “considerable number” of disciples elsewhere.

    According to the world, these men should have felt anxious, not peaceful. But they didn’t. Writing years later, Paul said, “I know indeed how to live in humble circumstances; I know also how to live with abundance… . I have the strength for everything through him who empowers me” (Philippians 4:12, 13).

    Will we face ups and downs? Fickle responses from people? Happiness interspersed with hardship? Yes. But we can still find peace in Christ.

    How? By stepping back and looking at the big picture. Lean into the arms of the divine Artist who is painting the masterpiece of your life. The chaos and beauty will become clearer, and God’s vision will make more sense as you look beyond your changing circumstances and remember his love and provision. So today and every day, take a deep breath, and ask the Lord for his gift of peace.

    “Jesus, you are my Prince of Peace!”

    Other Readings: Acts 14:19-28; Psalm 145:10-13, 21

    Culled from: https://wau.org/meditations/current/

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    #2248
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    May 6th, 2015

    Today’s meditation is from John 15: 1-8

    Remain in me, as I remain in you. (John 15:4)

    What do you do when you need to recover from a head cold? You get extra rest, drink more fluids, and take vitamins. But these remedies aren’t directly making you better. They can facilitate the process, but in the end, it’s your own immune system that fights off the sickness, and that process isn’t completely under your control.

    Spiritual growth is a little like getting over a cold: our efforts are only aids to our growth. The real growth comes from God. In today’s Gospel reading, Jesus explains this by saying that he is the vine, and we are the branches. Because we’re just branches, we can’t produce fruit on our own. Only as we are attached to the vine, receiving its vitality, are we fruitful.

    Sometimes we get these roles confused. We can begin to think that we are the active agent in spiritual growth. “God made the world,” we think, “He sent Jesus to redeem us; now it’s up to me.” While it may sound noble, this approach can lead us to be disconnected from the Lord. And that will render us fruitless.

    This passage shows us how important it is that we try to stay connected to Jesus. None of us wants to be fruitless. None of us wants to wither and die and fall off of the vine! We want to be useful to the Lord, don’t we? We want to be filled with his vitality, his energy, and his wisdom.

    This is why it’s important to be faithful to daily prayer, Scripture reading, and the sacraments. It’s also why we need to stay connected with fellow Christians and why we need to serve as he served. These things on their own won’t bring spiritual growth, but they will keep us connected to the life-giving vine.

    All we have to do is try our best to stay close to Jesus. Abiding in his presence is nothing more than trying to think and act the way we think Jesus would want us to in our day. If we can do just that, we will be giving his Spirit the freedom to shape us and change us. We will become more fruitful!

    “Thank you, Jesus, for promising to make me fruitful. Help me, Lord, to stay connected to you.”

    Other Readings: Acts 15:1-6; Psalm 122:1-5

    Culled from: https://wau.org/meditations/current/

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    #2263
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    May 7th, 2015

    Today’s meditation is from Acts 15: 7 – 21

    We ought to stop troubling the Gentiles who turn to God. (Acts 15:19)


    If you had been present at this meeting between Peter and the apostles, you might have been worried. This was no minor dispute! Some Jewish believers weren’t ready to mix with Gentiles, who didn’t share in their traditions. But Peter and James pointed out that God had poured his Spirit on the Gentiles, so they shouldn’t place any obstacles before them. Who was going to win this debate?

    The same Holy Spirit who started the debate in the first place, that’s who! He helped the apostles and elders see that they had all been saved by grace, so there was no need to require the Gentiles to live up to standards that God did not expect. The Spirit also helped them compromise on a few issues that were important both to Jews and Christians. Because they came together with humble, open hearts, the Spirit was free to move in them and help preserve their unity in faith.

    The Church has always had to deal with conflicts, but it has always relied on the Holy Spirit to work them out. In just a few months, we will hear from the Synod of Bishops on controversial marriage and family issues. Some imagine that the Church will compromise its doctrines. Others worry that the Church will be completely rigid and refuse to help families in any measurable way. But in the midst of all these concerns, we need to put our trust in the Holy Spirit. We need to trust that he will always guide and show us what the Lord wants. It may not happen overnight, and we may not like everything we will hear. But in the end, we can always trust that “the gates of the netherworld shall not prevail” against the Church (Matthew 16:18)!

    Until Jesus comes again, we will all have differing viewpoints on topics. We may even get into arguments with each other. But that’s okay, because the Spirit works through our discussions and debates and ultimately brings us all closer to the truth.

    Keeping this in mind, let’s pray for the Synod of Bishops. Let’s ask the Holy Spirit to fill all of our leaders with an ever-deepening desire to discern his voice.

    “Holy Spirit, guide our bishops. Help them discern how you want the Church to be your light to the world!”

    Other Readings: Psalm 96:1-3, 10; John 15:9-11

    Culled from: https://wau.org/meditations/current/

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    #2324
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    May 21st, 2015

    Today’s meditation is from John 17: 20 – 26

    … that they may all be one. (John 17:21)

    Is it possible, Lord? You prayed that Your people would be one in the same way that You and the Father are one. It seems too good to be true! I see so many people who call on Your name and yet are at odds with one another. But it’s not just other people. There are times when I catch myself holding onto past grudges or feeling superior to my brothers and sisters from other traditions.

    Lord, I know that You deeply desire that all your children be united. It’s what You prayed for on the night before you died, so it must be one of the deepest longings of Your heart. And if You prayed for unity, then it must be possible. It must be capable of going beyond what I can see with my eyes.

    You want so much more for us, Lord: more than just tolerating one another or trying to pretend our differences aren’t there, more than an uneasy truce or a compromise of our disagreements. You want to bind our hearts together, to knit us into one body with You as our head.

    Thank You, Lord, that You have provided the way! As You live in all of us, we can be “brought to perfection as one” (John 17:23). It is Your life in us that overcomes disunity. So instead of looking at others or myself, I need to look to You, draw near to You, unite myself more fully to You. As I grow closer to you, I will grow closer to my brothers and sisters. As we all seek You with sincerity, we will find ourselves on a path toward You that will bring us nearer to each other as well. It’s like a divine triangle with You at the top!

    I know that we will be fully united with each other only when we are with You in heaven. But I also know that this heavenly promise is available to us more and more as we pursue unity here on earth. So please, Lord, help us all break down walls of division. Lord, make us one!

    “Praise to you, Lord Jesus! You have made true unity possible. Help me to embrace your vision and dream so that we can become one in you!”

    Other Readings: Acts 22:30; 23:6-11; Psalm 16:1-2, 5, 7-11

    Culled from: https://wau.org/meditations/current/

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    #2377
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    Happy Pentecost Sunday, dear ladies!

    May the Holy Spirit continue to move in our lives, transforming and moulding us into women after God’s heart  :heart:

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    Monday, June 1st

    Today’s meditation is from Mark 12: 1- 12

    This is the heir. Come, let us kill him, and the inheritance will be ours. (Mark 12:7)

    We know what it’s like to second-guess a decision someone else has made. You look at an event after the fact and think about how you would have handled it better. If it were you coaching that football game, you would have called for a pass instead of a handoff. If you had been the presidential nominee, you would have chosen a different running mate. If you were that child’s parent, you would discipline her differently.

    Second-guessing is rarely helpful, and it’s especially the case when we read stories like today’s parable. We can think, “How could these tenants have been so stubborn and selfish? The landlord was just trying to collect his produce. I would never have treated these servants so cruelly.” To make matters worse, we understand that the landlord is God the Father, the servants are the prophets, and the “beloved son” is Jesus. Why couldn’t the scribes and Pharisees see these connections?

    The problem with this approach is that it deflects the message of the parable away from us. Whether we are ancient scribes or twenty-first-century Christians, God wants us to be fruitful. He has commissioned us, just as the landowner commissioned the tenants, to care for his creation. We are stewards of his kingdom, and he wants to know how we’re doing in that regard.

    What kind of “servants” will God send you today to check on his fruit? Maybe it will be a friend asking for help or a person needing someone to talk to. It may not be a person at all. It may be a verse from today’s readings—something you sense God wants you to act on. No matter how the Lord comes, you can be sure that he will not ask for something that you cannot give. So don’t reject him. Welcome him instead. Tell him, “Speak, Lord, your servant is listening.” Then, give him the fruit he is really looking for: your heart.

    “Lord, help me to receive your word and the promptings of your Spirit today.” 

    Other Readings: Tobit 1:3; 2:1-8 & Psalm 112:1-6

    Culled from https://wau.org/meditations/current/

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    Tuesday, July 2nd, 2015

    Today’s meditation is taken from Psalm 112

    Have you ever arrived home after a long day, feeling completely worn out? You want nothing more than to relax and unwind in a nice, warm bath—to let all the stress from the day wash right off of you.

    It may not seem obvious at first, but this is one way to think about the lavishness with which the just person treats the poor. After all, the word “lavish” has its roots in the Latin word lavare, which means “to wash.” According to today’s psalm, those who fear the Lord are so generous that they literally shower the poor with all they need.

    In one sense, we are all poor. We are all wounded by sin, and we all live in a fallen world. But it’s precisely because we are poor that Jesus is so lavish toward us. Think of how he showers you with mercy every time you confess your sins. Think of the immeasurable wealth of wisdom available to you through the Scriptures and the Church’s teachings. Think of the rich feast that is laid for you at the altar every time you celebrate the Eucharist. Day by day, minute by minute, the Holy Spirit is offering you an abundance of wisdom, insights, and guidance. So much refreshment, so many riches. And they’re all for you!

    Of course, all these lavish gifts aren’t meant just for you. One of the reasons why God is so generous is because he wants you to become generous as well. What else can you do with such abundance? You don’t have the room to keep it all to yourself! That’s why this psalm talks about how generous are those who fear the Lord. Everyone who has tasted of his goodness can’t help but share that goodness with everyone else.

    As you end your prayer today, take a piece of paper, write the word “lavish” on it, and put it in your pocket. Let it remind you of Jesus’ generosity toward you, and let it remind you to be just as generous with the people around you.

    “Thank you, Lord, for showering me with your grace. Give me a generous heart.”

    Other Readings: Tobit 2:9-14, Mark 12:13-17

    Culled from: https://wau.org/meditations/current/

    Photo Credits

    1. http://www.usatoday.com
    2. http://knbwinecellars.com
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